Job Posting: Curatorial Assistant, University of Alberta Art Collection

http://www.careers.ualberta.ca/Competition/S106624101/

The University of Alberta has an opening for a 12-month contract, with the possibility of extension, for a Curatorial Assistant. The pay range is from $27.03 to $36.71, and the deadline for applications is August 15th.

The University of Alberta is seeking an industrious and creative Curatorial Assistant for the University of Alberta Art Collection (UAAC). Reporting to the Curator of the University of Alberta Art Collection, the Curatorial Assistant is accountable for a range of museum activities and specific projects in support of the UAAC Collection. The Curatorial Assistant works as part of the curatorial team and in conjunction with the U of A Museums team.

Major areas of responsibility include:

  • Assists with researching and processing new acquisitions to museum standards
  • Assists with developing and maintaining computerized records of the Art collection in the collections management database (MIMSY XG)
  • Assists with moving and preparing objects as required for teaching, research, documentation/photography, access and exhibition purposes
  • Assists with the inventory of the collection
  • Assists with providing access to the collection by assisting with booking/facilitating tours; staffing museum public spaces
  • Assists with repurposing material for tours and school programs
  • Assists with providing supervision to volunteers and students

Qualifications

  • A minimum of a post-secondary degree in art history, museum studies, studio art or related discipline is preferred; equivalent combinations of education and experience will be considered
  • Experience and demonstrated knowledge of museum standards and collections management practices is required
  • Experience working with museum database management systems is an asset
  • Excellent communication skills (oral and written) is required
  • Experience supervising students and volunteers is an asset
  • Core competencies include: achievement orientated, analytical thinking, conceptual thinking, flexibility, organizational awareness, planning and initiative, self-confidence, self-development, sense of urgency, meticulous attention to detail and team cooperation

To apply, there is an online form, as well as a fax number and snail-mail address (at the link above).


Chapter News: ARLIS/NA Midstates Newsletter, Summer 2014

*please excuse cross-postings*

 Summer 2014 ARLIS/NA Midstates Newsletter

I’m pleased to report that the summer 2014 issue of the Midstates Newsletter is now available.
http://midstates.arlisna.org/MidNewsSummer2014.pdf

In this issue you’ll find:

- Letter from the Chair by Leigh Gates
– Living His Story Exhibition at Milner Library, Illinois State University by Kathleen Lonbom
– ARLIS/NA Midstates Bunce Travel Award Report by Amanda Meeks
– From the ARLIS/NA Chapters Liaison by Sarah Sherman
– New ARLIS/NA Midstates Chapter Officers
– ARLIS/NA Midstates Chapter Financial Report by Melanie Emerson
– Member News

Thanks to all the contributors for making this another great issue!

-Amy

——————————————————————–
Amy Trendler
University Libraries…A destination for research, learning, and friends
Architecture Librarian
Ball State University       765-285-5858
Muncie, IN 47306         aetrendler@bsu.edu


Newsletter 003

 

newsletter 003

The new issue of the ArLiSNAP Newsletter is here once again to catch you up on all the news and posts from the last week!

Receive our newsletter in your inbox every Monday simply by subscribing via the link below. Nominate yourself or an associate to be highlighted; keep up with ARLIS news and exhibits from around the world; jot down important events and upcoming deadlines; say your piece in one of the ArLiSNAP discussions; or view and apply for jobs you might have missed. Thanks for reading!

Newsletter 003: July 21-27, 2014

Subscribe here!


Architecture, Art & Design Library Specialist– New Jersey Inst. of Technology

The Architecture Library Specialist is responsible for the CoAD (College of Architecture and Design) Library in the absence of the Director and provides library tasks and services. The position works a closing shift schedule (currently 12:30 pm to 8:30 pm during fall and spring semesters). The schedule may include any hours or days of the week that the CoAD Library is open and may be changed as needed.

Provide reference service to the faculty and students in the absence of the Director of the CoAD Library. Interprets and explains library policies (circulation, fines, damage, etc.) to the library users; assists them in locating library materials and with equipment operation.
Teaches information literacy within designated CoAD courses as needed and creates related instructional materials and tutorials.

Supervises and maintains journal and book processing.

Coordinates the CoAD Library with the main library’s policies, technologies and processes in circulation, interlibrary loan, reserves etc.

Maintains the order of library collections (books, journals, videos, slides, materials samples, etc) as well as adequate equipment and supplies.

Creates and maintains web pages, and digitizes images and documents.

Assures the security of the library, staff, patrons, and equipment during hours of operation.

Shares responsibility for circulation, shelving, binding, equipment lending,reserves, interlibrary loan.

Works occasional weekends such as student open house events.

Responsible for the maintenance and development of the Littman Library Image Database and Digital Archive of Newark Architecture including, but not limited to, supervising students as needed.

Attends the meetings of the University Librarian, when possible, and takes minutes as needed.

To apply: https://njit.jobs/applicants/jsp/shared/frameset/Frameset.jsp?time=1405561418811


Job Posting: Audio-Video Preservation Fellowship, San Francisco

This is a one-year fellowship, 20-25 hours per week, paid but with no specific salary information.

The Bay Area Video Coalition (BAVC) is accepting applications for its Preservation Educational Resources Fellowship. The Fellow will work for a period of one year within the Preservation Department, assisting with the development of  a suite of educational resources designed to assist individuals and organizations alike in taking initial steps to assess and establish a preservation plan for their audiovisual materials….

We wish to work with a library, archives, film production or history student/recent graduate who aspires to learn about preservation planning and archival audiovisual formats and who demonstrates the strong desire to help us advance the field of moving image preservation.

Duties will include:

  • Researching existing audiovisual preservation tools and educational resources

  • Assisting with the research and acquisition of various samples of audiovisual formats

  • Assisting with the identification and documentation of conditions that can impact the well-being of audiovisual materials (during both storage and also playback)

  • Participating in, and providing support for, the production of educational resources (including print materials, instructional videos, and web content).

Skills acquired will include:
Knowledge of audiovisual preservation best practices and familiarity with the field of media preservation. A thorough understanding of the preservation of audiovisual materials (including equipment, format identification, proper care and handling and cleaning techniques, and playback and storage best practices).

Experience desired:

  • Video or audio production or post-production

  • Training in preservation or archives (particularly video or audio preservation), library education/ experience or current training in audiovisual archives or museum studies.

If interested, please send a resumé and cover letter to the BAVC Preservation Department at preservation@bavc.org

Bay Area Video Coalition

2727 Mariposa Street, 2nd Floor

San Francisco, CA 94110


Interview: Starting a Student Chapter

We’ve talked before about the value of having professional-association student chapters on campus, whether it’s just general awareness of career options and extracurriculars or the impact on your resume of helping to manage and plan events, fundraisers, field trips, etc. There are no ARLIS/NA student chapters (yet), but that doesn’t mean you can’t start one! (I guess ArLiSNAP is sort of your virtual student chapter.)

During my MLIS these past two years, I watched some fellow McGill students start up a student chapter of the Association of Moving Image Archivists. As media preservation is a pretty important topic to arts-librarianship students, I thought I would ask a few questions about the process, the need, and the benefits of bringing special-interest representation to your school. Justin Mckinney kindly agreed to answer my questions about his work founding the chapter.

(Photos by Fiona Mak.)

Film handling workshop with George Eastman House

Film handling workshop with George Eastman House

George Eastman Film Handling Workshop

George Eastman Film Handling Workshop

ArLiSNAP: Let’s start with student chapters generally – were you members of other student chapters to start?

Justin Mckinney: During my first year of library school, I was a member of the Association of Canadian Archivists student chapter at McGill. I started out keen and not knowing what I was doing and imagining all the great things we would accomplish, but nothing really happened all year and I wasn’t exactly as active as I could have been.

ArLiSNAP: What’s the value of having local representation of professional associations?

JM: I think it has the potential to help raise awareness about the organization. Also, it can educate student members about issues in the field and maybe even lead to practical opportunities to do stuff. I think it probably varies from year to year and association to association, and is really dependent on the group of people involved at any given time.

ArLiSNAP: Why the Association of Moving Image Archivists specifically?

JM: I became really interested in film history and film preservation after my undergrad, which led me down the path to library school. I was already an AMIA member before starting library school, and my main interest in the archivy/LIS world was and is film preservation. After a sort of underwhelming experience of my first year at library school (which included a complete absence of film archiving content), I was determined to take more of an active role in my own learning. Fortunately, I had a couple of great friends in the program who had similar interests and were very supportive, and it snowballed from there.

ArLiSNAP: What was the process for starting a student chapter?

JM: I started emailing (and harassing) the fine people at AMIA about how to start a student chapter and they explained what was needed, which was mainly a constitution and that the executive members all be members of AMIA. They put me in touch with the folks at the NYU AMIA student chapter, and they were kind enough to send me their constitution, which I basically amended to change any mention of NYU to McGill — from there, we were off and running.

As for McGill, I just emailed people at the School of Information Studies (SIS) and let them know what I was doing and they got us a table at the student chapter fair at the start of the school year. Throughout the year they were generally helpful about any questions I had and they also helped us get connected with the Masters of Library and Information Science Student Association (MLISSA), and the Post-Graduate Student Society (PGSS), which both provide funding for SIS student groups.

In general, though, it was mostly a lot of me emailing and badgering people and then getting information as needed. It’s not really a clear process to setting up a chapter, and I think it would be beneficial if there were more guidance or upfront information given about the process of starting one.

In regards to gauging student interest, we really had no idea what would happen. To start it was just the executive (myself, Mark Haydn as vice-president, and Nicholas Avedisian-Cohen as secretary and treasurer). My main goal was to make the student chapter viable enough for someone to take over for a second year, once we all graduated. At the aforementioned student chapter fair, we were pleasantly surprised to get over 20 students to sign up for our email list, and we held our first meeting, which had over ten people, including first- and second-year students. This was a pleasant surprise and I think demonstrated that many people are interested in the field and also frustrated with the lack of film/media archiving content in library school.

The main paperwork was getting the constitution ratified. We also had to apply for funding for various events through PGSS and MLISSA. A lot it was just learning on the fly, as none of us had ever done anything like this before. So it involved a lot of asking questions of people at McGill and AMIA, and remaining persistent.

Probably the biggest challenge was forging a relationship with the Moving Image Research Laboratory (MIRL) at McGill, a research project which houses a wonderful cinema space and collection of 16mm films. Pretty much all of the Fall 2013 semester was spent sending emails, stalking professors, and showing up unannounced, just trying to get our foot in the door. Finally in January, we got access and that proved to be our greatest success, as it allowed us to start handling film, cataloguing the collection, and providing real hands-on experience in the field.

ArLiSNAP: You also organized a one-day symposium, which brought in guest speakers and gave students a chance to present their research. Why did you choose a symposium as your first event? How did that organizational process work?

JM: Technically, our first event was a field trip to the National Preservation Centre at Library and Archives Canada in Gatineau. We had 20 people come along and we got a great tour of the facilities there, and met a bunch of professionals in the field. Mark Haydn and I also attended the AMIA Conference in 2013 and met a bunch of the students at the Eastman House in Rochester, NY. Thanks to these friendships, we were able to organize a trip down there as well, where we got to tour their facilities and participate in a film-handling workshop.

As for the symposium, I heard that all the other groups were doing one, so we just copied them. The process of organizing it wasn’t that difficult. We booked the space at SIS and just sent out a call for papers and presentations to members of our email list. I also contacted David Stevenson, the conservator at the Canadian Centre of Architecture, whom I met on a class field trip, about presenting. I also contacted Phil Spurrell, the proprietor of CineClub Film Society, who I’ve known for several years and volunteered with. He is very knowledgeable about the medium of film and had a lot of interesting experiences working with film.

ArLiSNAP: Have you found someone to hand off the reins to? Do you have any thoughts on the sustainability of the group, long-term?

JM: One of the really encouraging things about our membership was that we had a lot of first-year students who were incredibly eager and motivated. So by the time we started cataloguing the MIRL collection, we were regularly getting 15 to 20 people out to volunteer. So we knew we had a solid base of people who might be able to take over next year. From there, we asked for nominations and were able to come up with a four-person executive committee for another year.

My hope is that some of the connections we made with the folks at LAC, and the folks at Eastman House, will continue and allow for more educational opportunities and networking. Also, the MIRL collection is really outstanding and needs a lot of work to catalogue, plus the cinema space allows for screenings and projections of the collection. This hands-on practical experience is invaluable and I think should be a major factor in the success of the group long-term.

ArLiSNAP: Do you have any ideas or recommendations about how to improve LIS curricula to contain more of the useful things your AMIA chapter is trying to do? Or do you think it’s better off as extracurricular activity?

JM: I feel like the major deficit of the MLIS program is the lack of hands-on experience of working with materials regardless of type. Particularly in the archival end of things, where the theoretical felt very abstract and weird to me. I found my understanding only started to come together through some of the volunteering I was doing at the Jewish Public Library Archives, where I was handling documents, creating finding aids, and writing accession numbers on folders.

Obviously, because of the broad focus of the program, it would be hard to have a dedicated film archiving course, but it is certainly something that could be touched on. Maybe a course dealing directly with the preservation of objects, rather than the theoretical preservation of objects would be useful.

Unfortunately, I think everything is becoming so focused on digital objects and becoming “information specialists” to the detriment of acquiring actual tangible physical skills, which I fear is leaving a lot of graduates ill-equipped to manage the physical aspects of library and archive work. Maybe it’s for the better, as having a broader and more transferable set of skills could help grads deal with the job market, but I can’t help thinking something valuable is being lost in the transition.

AMIA Montreal Meets AMIA Rochester

AMIA Montreal Meets AMIA Rochester in New York

We’d love to hear about your experiences with professional associations, and if you’re thinking about starting a student chapter at your school (ARLIS/NA or otherwise). It’s not too late to plan something for the coming school year. Let us know in the comments!


Job Posting – Reference and Instruction Librarian – Savannah College of Art and Design, Atlanta, GA

Position Type:  Full Time

Position Title:  Reference and Instruction Librarian

Assigned Area of Responsibility:  SCAD Atlanta

Category:  Staff

Work Year:  Year Round
SCAD libraries are focal points for inspiration, information, study and research. The university seeks a reference and instruction librarian to support these growing and rapidly changing environments.

 

Reporting to the head librarian at SCAD Atlanta, you will apply your strong public service orientation and customer service skills to assist talented students and professors in their academic pursuits.

 

On a daily basis, you will provide patron service at the reference desk, in classes and over the Web; conduct research workshops and orientations; and instruct patrons on how to best take advantage of the library’s print and electronic information resources.

 

We invite you to develop new programs for library instruction; maintain reference service statistics; coordinate library donations; assess and develop overall library services including outreach initiatives; develop the library’s collections by subject area; and liaise with departments throughout the university.

 

You will also represent SCAD through local and national library organizations and participate in library and university-wide events and activities.

 

Requirements:

- M.L.S. degree from an ALA-accredited program

- Undergraduate or graduate degree in a subject taught at SCAD

- Familiarity with traditional and electronic information resources

- Working knowledge of effective search strategies and innovations in library instruction

 

Full application details and to apply: https://scadjobs.scad.edu/postings/8236


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