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Grant: the Carnegie Whitney Award for Reading Lists

Someone on the ARLIS-L listserv forwarded me this great grant opportunity from the ALA:

The Carnegie-Whitney Grant provides an award that is based on a special fund first established by Andrew Carnegie in 1902, “the income of which is to be applied to the preparation and publication of such reading lists, indexes and other bibliographical and library aids as will be especially useful in the circulating libraries of this country.” The Carnegie Fund was subsequently enhanced by a merger with a fund established by James Lyman Whitney in 1910. The Publishing Committee, a standing committee of the American Library Association, administers the grant.

The Carnegie-Whitney Grant provides grants for the preparation of popular or scholarly reading lists, webliographies, indexes and other guides to library resources that will be useful to users of all types of libraries in the United States.

Grants are awarded to individuals; local, regional or state libraries, associations or organizations, including units, affiliates and committees of the American Library Association, or programs of information and library studies/science.  International applicants welcome.

The project(s):

  • Must be focused on American Libraries
  • Must demonstrate how the project would stimulate the use of library resources
  • Must have the potential appeal and usefulness to a broad audience
  • Must be intended for national distribution
  • Must meet a need for publication
  • Must be completed within two years.
  • Must be new or in process.  Completed works, works under contract for publication, or projects associated with the completion of academic work are not eligible.

Grants are up to $5000 and several are awarded each year. This year’s deadline is November 4th, 2014.You can check out the application process and past recipients here:

http://www.ala.org/offices/publishing/sundry/alapubawrds/carnegiewhitney

Am I the only one thinking about a reading list of visual/digital literacy competencies and research? Or a list of copyright info for cultural heritage workers, or any number of genre-specific art guides, or ….. (Seriously, I would happily collaborate on a proposal for any of these. Drop me a line.)


Call for Award Applications: The Library Juice Press Essay Contest

The yearly call for essays is up! The deadline is September 1st, so you have all of this month to polish up some leftover schoolwork (if that’s how you wanna do it).

http://libraryjuicepress.com/contest.php

The intention of this contest is to encourage and reward good work in the field of library and information studies, humanistically understood, through a monetary award and public recognition.

The contest is open to librarians, library students, academics, and others.

Acceptable paper topics cover the full range of topics in the field of library and information studies, loosely defined.

Papers submitted may be unpublished, pending publication, or published in the year of the award.

Single and multiple-authored papers will be accepted.

Any type of paper may be entered as long as it is not a report of an empirical study. Examples of accepted forms would be literature review essays, analytical essays, historical papers, and personal essays. The work may include some informal primary research, but may not essentially be the report of a study.

Submitted papers may be part of a larger project.

The minimum length is 3000 words. The maximum length is 10,000 words.

Criteria for judgment:

  • Clarity of writing
  • Originality of thought
  • Sincerity of effort at reaching something true
  • Soundness of argumentation (where applicable)
  • Relevance to our time and situation

The award shall consist of $1000 and a certificate suitable for framing.

Entries must be submitted in MS Word format by September 1st. Entries may be submitted to inquiries@libraryjuicepress.com.

The winning paper, and possibly a number of honorable mentions, are announced on November 1st.

Papers will be judged by a committee selected for their accomplishments in the field, and in order to represent a range of perspectives.

Although we are a publisher, submission of a paper for this award in itself does not imply any transfer, licensing, or sharing of your publication rights.


Student Essay Award: Pratt Severn Best Student Research Paper Award from ASIS&T

Here’s another opportunity to get published, fund a conference trip, and notch up your resume:

The Best Student Research Paper Award is organized by the Association for Information Science and Technology, and rewards a masters-level research effort that in some way involves technology. (Metadata? Cataloguing technology? Arts databases? Digitization techniques? Tumblr for institutions?) The prize includes possible publication in the society’s journal, and $500 to defray the cost of attending the annual conference.

The deadline for submission is June 15th. Your submission needs to fall under the general scope of the Journal of the Association for Science and Information Technology. The award will be presented at their annual conference, in Seattle this year, October 31st – November 4th.

Eligibility:

Any student in a Masters degree-granting institution can submit a paper. Doctoral theses are not eligible.

Papers submitted must fall into the scope of JASIST and must be endorsed by a faculty sponsor for submission to the contest.

Papers submitted should be original manuscripts (not previously published) and should not be submitted to other publications or groups while they are being considered by the Jury.

You’ll need to submit a cover letter with your personal information, the paper (without identifying information), and “no more than two letters of endorsement from faculty sponsors.”

Your work will be judged on “technical competence in information science, significance of information science findings, originality, and clarity of expression.” You’ll find the electronic submission process at the awards page.


Student Essay Award: Book History Essay Prize

Book History, a yearly scholarly journal on the history of printing and publishing, gives away an annual essay award to graduate students writing about books. It’s composed of a $400 cash prize and publication in the journal.

http://www.sharpweb.org/book-history-essay-prize/

“The deadline for submission for each editorial year is 31 August. Please contact either Ezra Greenspan or Jonathan Rose for more information.”

It doesn’t seem to require that the essay be written for class credit, or suggest a word limit or range. So, if you don’t have any appropriate pieces lying around, you can start writing now to meet that end-of-summer deadline. You’ll want to follow the rather loose guidelines for submission to the journal, at the bottom of this page:

“Authors should send to the appropriate editor one copy of their work – either in hard copy or in electronic form as a Microsoft Word file, or both – which should be typed double spaced (including notes and citations) and documented in accordance with the Chicago Manual of Style. The manuscript may be submitted as an email attachment, after advance notice to the editor. The title page should include the author’s name, telephone number, postal address, and E-mail address. Contributors are welcome to submit illustrations and graphs with their texts. Due to the journal’s book-length format, essays of unusual length are welcome. Submissions acceptable to the editors will be double reviewed by outside experts in the field.”

Access to previous issues of Book History can be had through membership in SHARP or Project Muse. You might also be interested in this list of past essay prize winners.


Deadline reminder: ARLIS/NA Research Awards

If you’ve seen a great online art publication or website this year that was created by an ARLIS member or group including ARLIS members, please consider nominating the project for a research award — we’d love to hear about it and reward the best. Nominating a project you’ve seen is very easy: follow the link below and you will use a handy google online form.

Each year, the Research Awards Subcommittee recognizes the work of ARLIS/NA members with two types of research awards: one for future/proposed projects, and another (two, actually) for finished/completed projects.

Apply or nominate today. Applications and nominations are due on February 26, 2014.

Guidelines and application forms are found at http://www.arlisna.org/about/awards/awards_index.html#research

For questions, please contact the co-chairs of the Research Awards Subcommittee, Shalimar White (WhiteS@doaks.org) and Karyn Hinkle (hinkle@bgc.bard.edu).


Reminder: ARLIS/NA Travel Award Applications Due Feb. 5

REMINDER: Conference Travel Awards – Apply Now!

Due Wednesday, February 5th

The ARLIS/NA Travel Awards Committee is pleased to announce the followingTravel Awards for attending annual Conference of ARLIS/NA, to be held May 1-5, in Washington, DC. Several awards are available to students and non-ARLIS members, so be sure to see the full list of awards!

The application form can be found at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2014TravelAwards

More information and a full list of the available Travel Awards can be found on the ARLIS/NA website: http://www.arlisna.org/about/awards/awards_index.html

Details about the conference can be found here: http://www.arlisna.org/washingtondc2014/index.php


Application deadline for all travel awards: February 5, 2014, 11:59pm EST.


Apply now: ARLIS/SE 2014 Travel Award

Are you an art library student or professional living in the ARLIS Southeast geographic region? Consider applying for the 2014 ARLIS/SE Professional Development Travel Award! Full details on the award and a link to the application are available on the ARLIS/SE website.


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