Featured Posts
Society of American Archivists Annual Meeting Recap Check out the latest edition of the ArLiSNAP Newsletter A Success Story: Interview with Mackenzie Salisbury Join the community: Volunteer with ArLiSNAP!

The First-Ever NMC Horizon Report for Libraries

If you don’t know the New Media Consortium, you should: they’re doing great work in researching and predicting new technologies and trends in cultural heritage. (See their Museum Horizons report from late last year if you’re into 3D tech, interactivity, augmented reality using your mobile devices, etc.)

They’ve released a Horizons report for libraries, which is apparently their first! You’ll notice it’s for academic and research libraries, not necessarily public or special, but, baby steps. There are lots of interesting assessments of ongoing problems, like capturing digital records of research, keeping up with alternative research avenues, collaboration and embedded librarianship, etc.

If you want to check it out, I recommend looking at pages 20-21 for a quick discussion of embedded librarianship, incorporating literacy lessons into curricula, and how to collaborate with teachers to provide a more comprehensive education.

http://www.nmc.org/publications/2014-horizon-report-library

From the press release:

Lyon, France (August 20) — Today the New Media Consortium (NMC) in collaboration with the University of Applied Sciences (HTW) Chur, the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB), Hannover, and ETH-Bibliothek Zurich are releasing the NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition at a special session of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) World Library and Information Congress 80th General Conference and Assembly. This is the first edition of the NMC Horizon Report that delves into the realm of academic and research libraries in a global context.

 The report describes findings from the NMC Horizon Project, an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on teaching, learning, and creative inquiry. Six key trends, six significant challenges, and six emerging technologies are identified across three adoption horizons over the next one to five years, giving library leaders and staff a valuable guide for strategic technology planning. The format of the report was designed to provide these leaders with more in-depth insight into how the trends and challenges are accelerating and impeding the adoption of technology, along with their implications for policy, leadership, and practice.
“Education professionals across the world have used the higher education editions of the NMC Horizon Report for years as a springboard for discussion around important trends and challenges,” says Larry Johnson, Chief Executive Officer of the NMC and co-principal investigator for the project. “Finally we have been able to produce a report aimed directly at the needs of academic and research libraries – and what we have found is that academic and research libraries are leveraging new technology in some very important and creative ways.”
Key Trends Accelerating Technology Adoption for Academic and Research Libraries
The NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition identifies “Increasing Focus on Research Data Management for Publications” and “Prioritization of Mobile Content and Delivery” as fast trends driving changes in academic and research libraries over the next one to two years. The “Evolving Nature of the Scholarly Record” and “Increasing Accessibility of Research Content” are mid-range trends expected to accelerate technology use in the next three to five years; and “Continual Progress in Technology, Standards, and Infrastructure” and the “Rise of New Forms of Multidisciplinary Research” are long-range trends that will be impacting libraries for five years and beyond.
“The trends identified by the expert panel indicate that libraries are doing a better job at making their content and research accessible, whether through mobile apps, enriched catalogs, linking data, and user friendly websites or by creating more spaces and opportunities for discovery,” notes Rudolf Mumenthaler, Professor for Library Science at HTW Chur and co-principal investigator for the report. “The outcomes of the report are very compelling and it is an honor for HTW Chur to be deeply involved in this project.”
Significant Challenges Impeding Technology Adoption In Academic and Research Libraries
A number of challenges are acknowledged for presenting barriers to the mainstream use of technology in academic and research libraries. “Embedding Academic and Research Libraries in the Curriculum” and “Rethinking the Roles and Skills of Librarians” are perceived as solvable challenges – those which we both understand and know how to solve. “Capturing and Archiving the Digital Outputs of Research as Collection Material” and “Competition from Alternative Avenues of Discovery” are considered difficult challenges, which are defined as well understood but with solutions that are elusive. Described as wicked challenges are “Embracing the Need for Radical Change” and “Maintaining Ongoing Integration, Interoperability, and Collaborative Projects,” which are complex to define, much less address.
“ETH-Bibliothek is proud to be a partner of this report,” shares Andreas Kirstein, Vice Director and Head of Media and IT Services at ETH-Bibliothek, and co-principal investigator of the project. “By articulating some of the most daunting challenges that academic and research libraries face, we are already making progress toward solving them.”
Important Developments in Technology for Academic and Research Libraries
Additionally, the report identifies “Electronic Publishing” and “Mobile Apps” as technologies expected to enter mainstream use in the first horizon of one year or less. “Bibliometrics and Citation Technologies” along with “Open Content” are seen in the second horizon of two to three years; “The Internet of Things” as well as “Semantic Web and Linked Data” are seen emerging in the third horizon of four to five years.
The subject matter in this report was identified through a qualitative research process designed and conducted by the NMC that engages an international body of experts in libraries, education, technology, research, business, and other fields around a set of research questions designed to surface significant trends and challenges and to identify emerging technologies with a strong likelihood of adoption in academic and research libraries. The NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition details the areas in which these experts were in strong agreement.
“This first library edition of the Horizon Report marks some important evolutionary steps,” says Lambert Heller, head of Open Science Lab at the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB), Hannover and co-principal investigator of the project. “Academic and research libraries are now being seen as incubators for experimenting with emerging technologies and are even leading the way at many university campuses across the world.”
The NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Library Edition is available online, free of charge, and is released under a Creative Commons license to facilitate its widespread use, easy duplication, and broad distribution.

LOC’s The Signal: All About Digital Art

In case you’re in the market for some light summer reading:

The Library of Congress has a great digital preservation blog called The Signal. Recently they’ve been focusing on plenty of art-related issues, from digital art (and the power of the GIF) to preserving artists’ websites and communities.

There’s even some meta content, in the form of an interview with someone who talks about libraries and archives as aesthetic experiences:

Shannon: As I mentioned earlier, I’ve always loved teaching about, with, and through art. Art offers us so many rich and wonderful things (or events, or ideas…) to think with, and it helps us recognize that understanding isn’t purely cognitive; it’s also affective, aesthetic. Archives and libraries, I argue, are intensely aesthetic environments: information reaches us in various forms and materialities; we store that information on bookshelves and server racks; we access it on tabletops and laptops and through interfaces. These are all aesthetic variables that have, in my mind, huge epistemological significance. And acknowledging archives, libraries and databases as aesthetic entities not only helps patrons to better understand how they think and learn; but it also, ideally, helps practitioners recognize that the physical and digital environments they create aren’t neutral containers of information: they give shape to information and knowledge, and thus constitute what it is.

Shannon Mattern goes on to offer examples of artists working with the form of libraries and archives (not just their content). (Feel free to add this to your resource list for library advocacy, Ellen!)

You can always sign up to receive The Signal’s Digital Preservation newsletter in your inbox (if, like me, you forgot to regularly check even your favourite blogs). It’s a great resource to help you keep on top of digital developments, even if you’re not planning to focus on the tech side of GLAM work.


Library Assistant II- The Getty

Overview:
Working under the supervision of the Digital Library Specialist and the Head of Digital Services, this position participates in the creation and maintenance of digital collections. Works closely with staff in Digital Services, Special Collections Cataloging, Information Systems, and other Getty Research Institute units. Creates derivatives of digital images, and may occasionally create derivatives of video and audio files as well. Troubleshoots and reconciles errors (e.g. data orphans, malformed files) before ingest package is created. May create ingest packages for the digital repository and performs ingest procedures. With guidance from the Digital Library Specialist, maps, extracts, and transforms existing cataloging data into usable metadata for digitized materials. Familiarity with data modeling, metadata schemas, and controlled vocabularies and thesauri preferred. Knowledge of archival and library descriptive practices helpful.
Responsibilities:
* Applies knowledge of libraries and online records to assignments of moderate complexity * Competent to work with and answer questions regarding library information resources * Assists in development and maintenance of databases and operating procedures * Tolerance for detail-oriented, high-volume, and, at times, repetitive work * Familiarity with digital imaging best practices, capture devices, file formats * Familiarity with digital repository metadata standards helpful
Qualifications:
* Bachelor’s degree in art history or related discipline
* Minimum 2-3 years related experience
* Reading knowledge in at least one modern foreign language preferred
* Good written and verbal skills; attention to detail

Apply here.


Upcoming ALCTS Webinar: How to Present a Webinar

ALCTS Webinar: How to Present a Webinar

Date: Wednesday, February 5, 2014

All webinars are one hour in length and begin at 11am Pacific, noon Mountain, 1pm Central, and 2pm Eastern time.

Description

Webinars have become a standard continuing education tool. ALCTS is committed to creating new webinars on emerging issues for all technical services topics, and we would like to train possible presenters on how to develop and present a webinar.

Join Keri Cascio, an experienced trainer and former chair of the ALCTS Continuing Education Committee, for a how-to presentation on webinars. Topics for this session include:

  • choosing your subject focus

  • structuring your webinar

  • keeping your attendees interested

Who Should Attend?

Anyone interested in being a webinar presenter should attend this session.

Presenter

Keri Cascio is the Director of Innovative Technologies and Library Resource Management at the Linda Hall Library of Science, Engineering & Technology. She has worked at various public libraries in Missouri and was a trainer for the Missouri Library Network Corporation. Keri currently serves as Director at Large for ALCTS, and was a member of the ALCTS Continuing Education Committee for five years. She holds a Masters in Library Science from the University of Missouri – Columbia.

 

*****************

Fee

Free

How to Register

Register here:  https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/505265208

Contact

For questions or comments related to this free webinar, contact Julie Reese, ALCTS Events Manager at 1-800-545-2433, ext. 5034 or jreese@ala.org.


Free Continuing Education Events in July

Some selections from  a list compiled by the Vermont Department of Libraries. Enjoy!

July 9 (1-2 pm)

How to Build Websites Like Hollywood Builds Movies (O’Reilly)

In this webcast, we’ll look at the lifecycle of various Web development projects through the lens of Hollywood storytelling. Learn how to deliver successful projects that are on time, on budget, and meet customer expectations through a comparison of how the narrative structure of various films compares to different process models for site development. Not only will you come away with a better understanding of how to approach your next Web development project, but you’ll also gain a greater appreciation for the life lessons taught by some of your favorite Hollywood films.

For more information and to register for this program, visit: http://bit.ly/128vH8U

July 9 (2-3 pm)

Grantseeking Basics (GrantSpace)

Gain an introduction to the world of foundation fundraising. Are you a representative of a nonprofit organization? Are you new to fundraising? Do you want to learn how the funding research process works, and what tools and resources are available? Learn how to become a better grantseeker! In this class we will cover: what you need to have in place before you seek a grant; the world of grantmakers; the grantseeking process; and available tools and resources.

For more information and to register for this program, visit: http://bit.ly/111YEZ5

July 10 (12-1 pm)

Kiss Your BUT Good-Bye to Achieve Professional and Personal Success (American Management Association)

Joe and Bob Azelby are seasoned business executives who believe that a career stalls because an individual lacks a certain skill or has a behavior that makes them a less qualified candidate. We all have weaknesses, which the Azelby brothers refer to as “BUTs.”  For example: Bill is a hard worker BUT he can’t influence people and Larry is a great producer BUT he is a lousy manager.  Most people do not have any idea how their BUTs are inhibiting their career advancement because their colleagues and even their managers are unwilling to provide much needed candid feedback. This webcast will help you identify your BUTs and provide the tools necessary to shrink them. In addition, they’ll explore the importance of strong managers and demonstrate how a manager’s BUT can have a negative impact on his or her team.

For more information and to register for this program, visit: http://bit.ly/Yr606r

July 10 (4-5 pm)

3D Printing for Everyone: What you need to build your own 3D printer (O’Reilly)

In this webcast, I will introduce you to my open source 3D Printer that I built from a kit. I’ll share my experiences of both joy and tears, from assembly and tuning, to modeling and printing. We’ll cover the kinds of open source models, compare their commercial counterparts, talk about heat, plastic types and potential. If you are curious about 3D printing, but don’t know much about it, I hope to cover all of the basics. If you have been doing your research, but have some pointed questions that will get you off the fence, I hope to answer those too. By the end of the session, my hope is you will all want to build 3D printers of your own, and have all of the information you need to get started.

For more information and to register for this program, visit: http://bit.ly/152kyL7

July 12 (2-3 pm)

Making Difficult Conversations Easy (Effectiveness Institute)

Do you shy away from conflict? In organizations across the world conflict is avoided. Expectations go unmet, values are violated, and overall under-performance exists because people do not know how to effectively resolve issues without resorting to the use of power. This one-hour session introduces you to concepts that enable you to begin to “integrate conflict” – to walk into it and effectively handle it – rather than avoid it.

For more information and to register for this program, visit: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/702428768

July 17 (1-2 pm)

Leading Organizational Change (NonProfit Webinars)

In a rapidly changing world, every leader needs to understand how to effectively guide organizational change. Change may be necessary for many reasons, such as meeting new customer demands; implementing a strategic plan; upgrading technology systems; or coping with challenges. Leaders often wonder how to promote buy-in and engagement during what is sometimes a difficult process. This webinar for staff and board members will focus on: principles of change; understanding how people react to change; common mistakes and how to avoid them; working with resistance; and maintaining open communication. You will learn practical tips and be introduced to resources for further learning.

For more information and to register for this program, visit: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/788949432

July 17 (2-3 pm)

Library Social Media Use (WebJunction)

Over half of the world’s 2 billion internet users interact with social media tools to create, share, and exchange information and ideas while online. Libraries are using these tools to market programs and services, and to connect and engage with their communities beyond the library walls. Join us as we explore Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest as examples of tools that are being used successfully by libraries. The webinar will cover how to create, administer, moderate, and leverage your library’s online presence. Some basic security settings for each social media tool will be discussed as well.

For more information and to register for this program, visit: http://bit.ly/13dtqhZ

July 18 (11 am-12 pm)

DIY Options for Mobile Websites (Texas State Library and Archives Commission)

Are you interested in do-it-yourself options for developing a mobile website for your library?  The Texas State Library is planning on offering training on this topic, but we need your input.  Christine Peterson of Amigos Library Services is conducting a 1 hour webinar, showcasing the following common DIY mobile options: Google Sites mobile templates, Kurago Kurogo Mobile Platform, jQuery Mobile, and Responsive Web Design using CSS media queries.  In conjunction with the webinar, you will have an opportunity to vote via survey for the solution you would like to receive training on.

For more information and to register for this program, visit: https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/310538570

July 24 (1-2 pm)

Building Social Capital to Enhance Collaboration (NonProfit Webinars)

Typically when people think about social capital, it is associations, networks and relationships that result in a gain. I believe that organizations tend to build partners with those who are similar (bonding social capital) instead of bridging, another form of social capital with those who are different. In this workshop, participants will learn more about social capital and how to leverage networks that can increase program partners and potential funders.

For more information and to register for this program, visit: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/436959193

July 31 (10-11 am)

Tech Talk with Michael Sauers (Nebraska Library Commission)

In this monthly feature of NCompass Live, the NLC’s Technology Innovation Librarian, Michael Sauers, will discuss the tech news of the month and share new and exciting tech for your library. There will also be plenty of time in each episode for you to ask your tech questions. So, bring your questions with you, or send them in ahead of time, and Michael will have your answers.

For more information and to register for this program, visit: http://nlc.nebraska.gov/scripts/calendar/eventreg.asp?ProgID=12387

July 31 (1-2 pm)

Accountable Fundraising: You Can Integrate Achievement, Long-term Success and Stewardship (NonProfit Webinars)

Suggested practices in this webinar will significantly improve your bottom line as you gain better results for your cause, increases loyalty from staff and board, and deepen the level of appreciation from those who support your mission.

For more information and to register for this program, visit: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/363727288

In the event that you aren’t available during those times, or you would like to check out past webinars, here are the links to archived events:

OPAL Webinar Archives

Infopeople

Common Knowledge

School Library Journal

Booklist

Tech Soup

Library Journal

eSchool News Webinars

WebJunction

SirsiDynix Institute Webinars

TL Virtual Cafe

Washington State Library First Tuesdays

NonProfit Webinars

Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Colorado State Library: CSL in Session

Lunch Lessons with CLiC (Colorado Library Consortium)

ALA Tech Source Makerspace Webinars


Co-editor position with ARLIS Multimedia & Technology

ARLIS/NA Needs You!

 

ARLISNAP members are especially encouraged to apply for the new ARLIS Multimedia and Technologies Reviews co-editor position.  It is a great way to gain some practical experience as an editor, develop more as a professional, and learn loads about all the communication and multimedia technologies out there serving the arts research disciplines. If you are interested in this post but unsure that you meet the qualifications, please contact me.  I’d be happy to discuss this position with you more.  See below for the full call.  Thanks, Hannah

ARLIS Multimedia & Technology Reviews is designed to provide insightful evaluations of projects, products, events, and issues within the broad realm of multimedia and technology as they pertain to arts scholarship, research, and librarianship.  Subject areas may include films, performance videos, viral videos, video games, productivity software, mobile devices, social media applications, digital design collectives, research guides, databases and indexes, native online exhibitions, and much more.

The Multimedia & Technology Reviews Co-Editor is appointed by the President for a two-year, renewable term. The incumbent works with the M&T editorial team, which in includes the Professional Resources Editor who also convenes the team and serves as liaison to the Communications and Publications Committee, as well as a third co-editor appointed by the ARLIS/NA Reference and Information Services Section.

This position shares responsibility with the other co-editors for all content posted to the reviews’ featured section on the ARLIS/NA website.  At the same time, this position will be involved in soliciting and selecting appropriate topics for review.

Major Responsibilities:

  • Identifies potential topics for review
  • Solicits reviewer participation from the ARLIS/NA membership and affiliate organizations
  • Assigns reviews to reviewers
  • Obtains visuals, if available, from the reviewed resources to serve as “cover art”
  • Edits reviews alongside the other editors
  • Formats all reviews and submits them in required format to the ARLIS/NA Web site editor; checks posted reviews and notifies the Web site editor if any changes are necessary

Members with proven editorial experience and deep interest or knowledge in arts research technologies and related forms of multimedia are encouraged to submit a letter of interest and résumé to Hannah Bennett byFriday, June 21, 2013. Any inquiries about the position may also be directed to me.


Speed presentations: Pecha Kucha

What is Pecha Kucha?

No, it’s not what your grandmother called you as a child.

It’s a rapid-fire, image-based presentation format. Presenters have 20 images up for 20 seconds each, for a 6 minute and 40 second presentation. Started in 2006 in Japan as a way to showcase architects’ portfolios, it has spread worldwide.

This year, at the Emerging Technologies Panel at the ArLiS/NA 2013 conference in Pasadena, seven presenters will give Pecha Kutcha-style presentations.  This format has been used at the Society of American Archivist 2012 and will be used for the upcoming Society of Architectural Historians conference.

Some helpful links:

Wikipedia entry for Pecha Kucha

Pecha Kucha pronunciation in muppet video (we really needed this!)

Pecha Kucha training bite. Clear concise British speaker explaining what Pecha Kucha is while doing a Pecha Kucha presentation.

Pecha Kucha article and presentation. Daniel Pink, Wired magazine.

Pecha Kucha Nights: Guide to Better Presentation Skills:

396+ Pecha Kucha presentations

Thanks to Cathy Billings and Sarah Sherman for the links.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 714 other followers