Survey: Canadian LIS students, grads, and hiring staff on transition to academic librarianship

Please check out the following survey and see if you qualify! The research is on MLIS students, recent graduates, and hiring librarians and managers at Canadian academic institutions. (This is reposted from a listserv.)

Dear LIS colleagues,

 

This email is to invite you to participate in a research study exploring the transition between LIS education and employment in academic libraries.

 

Our study seeks to examine how students are prepared for and what challenges exist when transitioning from LIS to a career in academic librarianship. Our findings will help contribute to Canadian LIS literature and provide recommendations to LIS programs and employers to help support the successful transition from school to employment.

 

The survey will remain open until July 28, 2014. Please distribute this email widely.

 

Eligible participants include:

·         Current students enrolled in a Master of Library and Information Studies, or directly equivalent, program at a Canadian university. Students can be pursuing part-time or full-time studies. Participants in this category must have completed approximately 50 percent of their program and have an intention or interest in pursuing a career in academic librarianship.

·         Recent graduates who have completed a Master of Library and Information Studies, or directly equivalent, program at a Canadian university within the last year (graduated no earlier than April 2013) and are actively seeking employment at a Canadian academic library.

·         New professionals who have completed a Master of Library and Information Studies, or directly equivalent, program at a Canadian university within the last three years (graduated no earlier than April 2011). Participants in this category are recent graduates who are currently employed full- or part-time, either on a permanent or contract basis, at a Canadian academic library.

·         Hiring managers or librarians who participate in hiring committees at any Canadian academic library, in any discipline, on either a contract or permanent basis. Librarians involved in other elements of the hiring process and supervisors of new professionals are also encouraged to participate.

 

If you have any questions, please, contact either Laura Thorne by phone at (250) 807-9107 or by email at laura.thorne@ubc.ca or Catherine McGoveran by phone at (613) 562-5800 ext. 2725 or by email at catherine.mcgoveran@uottawa.ca.

 

Survey data is being collected via Verint, a survey tool provided by UBC IT. Verint is a Canadian-hosted survey solution complying with the BC Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. All data is stored and backed up in Canada.

 

This study is being conducted in English; however, should a participant require assistance to participate, the researchers will endeavour to provide this assistance wherever possible.

 

When completed, the researchers will seek to publish the results of the study. If you would like a copy of the research findings, please send a request to either Laura Thorne by phone at (250) 807-9107 or by email at laura.thorne@ubc.caor Catherine McGoveran by phone at (613) 562-5800 ext. 2725 or by email at catherine.mcgoveran@uottawa.ca.

 

To participate in our study, please follow the link: http://www.surveyfeedback.ca/surveys/wsb.dll/s/1g336c

 

Thank you for your support,

Laura Thorne & Catherine McGoveran

 

Laura Thorne

Learning Services Librarian, UBC Okanagan Campus Library

The University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus

(250) 807-9127

laura.thorne@ubc.ca

 

Catherine McGoveran

Bibliothécaire spécialisée en information gouvernementale / Government Information Librarian

Centre d’information GSG Information Centre ; Bibliothèque Morisset Library

Université d’Ottawa / University of Ottawa

(613) 562-5800 ext./poste 2725

catherine.mcgoveran@uottawa.ca


Job Postings: Emily Carr University of Art + Design (Vancouver) needs a Circulation Assistant and a Library Assistant

http://www.ecuad.ca/about/careers/jobs/313762

http://www.ecuad.ca/about/careers/jobs/313761

Both positions require a Library Technician diploma; further details can be found at each link. The deadline for both positions is July 4th (that’s tomorrow!) — I apologize for not posting these more in advance, but I’ve just gotten back from a trip across the country. Also, summer heat wave. Very convenient excuse.

 


Job Postings: Reference Librarians (part-time, temporary), Simon Fraser University, BC

Please excuse the fact that I’m sharing this PDF from my own Google Drive; it was just emailed out this morning and no copy can be found on the SFU website.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4JS-UKo3Mi5Tk55YlhZV29fa2lFN3lhS0pLeFYzeGZ2RXlZ/edit?usp=sharing

The SFU Library invites applications for limited term part-time reference librarian positions at the Burnaby, Surrey and Vancouver campuses for the Fall 2014 and Spring 2015 semesters…. These positions will be of interest to individuals with a strong public service ethic and current experience providing reference service in a broad range of subject areas. Academic library experience is an asset but not required. Candidates must have an ALA accredited MLIS or equivalent degree in hand by start date.

 

These are broad-range reference positions that can cover arts instruction, visual literacy, urban planning, and other topics of interest to arts librarianship. To wit:

The W.A.C. Bennett Library in Burnaby supports a wide range of programs and courses across all disciplines through its print and electronic collections, reference and instructional services, and liaison program. Students from the social sciences are especially active users of this library.

The Fraser Library in Surrey (http://www.lib.sfu.ca/surrey) focuses on media and digital resources in addition to print collections, in support of programs including Interactive Arts and Technology, Education, Arts and Social Sciences, Science, Computer Science and Business. Staff work as a team to offer the full range of traditional library services, plus the Library circulates equipment such as digital cameras and camcorders.

Belzberg Library serves graduate, undergraduate and non-credit programs at the SFU Vancouver campus, including: business, liberal studies, gerontology, publishing, urban studies, public policy, contemporary arts and communications. The library provides a full range of reference, liaison, instruction, and loans services. Further information is at the SFU Library web site at: http://www.lib.sfu.ca/belzberg.

Subject to budgetary approval, these part-time librarian positions are available from are available from are available from September to December  2014, or September 2014 to April 2015. Positions will include weekday, evening and weekend hours. Exact dates and schedules will be negotiated with the successful candidates and are dependent on available funding.

 

Deadline for applications is 4:30pm PST on June 13, 2014.


Job posting: Special Project Officer, McGill University Library, Montreal

http://www.mcgill.ca/library/sites/mcgill.ca.library/files/20140520-special-project-officer-rbsc.pdf

McGill University Rare Books and Special Collections is looking to fill a one-year, full-time position working with “accessions to an important architectural archive held by McGill Library comprised mostly of large architectural plans, paper archives, related visual materials and digital projects. The Officer will update inventories and assist in the updating of the website.”

The position pays $25/hour and the deadline for applications is May 30th, 2014.


Books of the Heart

books-of-the-heart

Pictured above are the current contents of the Crouch Fine Arts Library’s display at Baylor University Library in Waco, Texas. For the month of February 2014, a small but eclectic group of selections from the Baylor Artist Book Collection pertaining to *LOVE* in its varied manifestations engages viewers with themes as diverse as the playful revision of Shakespearian dialogue in r&j: the txt message edition to more jaded reflections in Heart Assortment: A Bittersweet Sampler. 

Many academic libraries have artist book collections of various sizes and scopes. Some institutions collect regionally, thematically, or structurally, while others prefer a mix of all types and kinds. Collection scale, of course, depends heavily on the acquisitions budget. Art librarians have found artist books to be interesting objects for display within their libraries and useful tools for developing interdisciplinary relationships with faculty and students.  The Baylor Artist Book Collection is often requested for art department classes, but is also requested by professors from other departments. An emerging trend at Baylor is engagement by students in the Medical Humanities program.

For more information on the collection see http://www.researchguides.baylor.edu/heartbooks.

What other ways are artist book collections used in libraries? Do you or would you collect artist books in your role as an art librarian? Why do you think these types of collections are popular in an increasingly digital age?

 


Webinar Series: What is a Data-Driven Academic Library?

Our readers who are interested in pursuing a career in academic libraries may be interested in this free webinar series, offered through Library Journal. Even if you’re not available when the webinars are running live, those who register will receive a link to the archive when it becomes available.

Part 1:  What is a Data-Driven Academic Library? Wednesday, December 4, 2013,
3:00-4:00 PM ET/12:00 PM – 1:00 PM PT
Part 2:   The Evolution of Usage:
Analyzing and Benchmarking Use, Wednesday, December 11th, 2013,
3:00-4:00 PM ET/12:00 AM – 1:00 PM PT
Part 3:   Redefining Scholarly Value
Through New Data, Wednesday, December 18th, 2013, 3:00-4:00 PM ET/12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
PT

Complete details and links to register:  lj.libraryjournal.com/2013/11/webcasts/what-is-a-data-driven-academic-library/

CYNETART 2009 :: rehearsals for European Tele-Plateaus, by Matthias Härtig/TMA Hellerau. http://www.flickr.com/photos/body-bytes/4133106313/

CYNETART 2009 :: rehearsals for European Tele-Plateaus, by Matthias Härtig/TMA Hellerau. http://www.flickr.com/photos/body-bytes/4133106313/


The Sunday Scoop: Makerspaces and Academic Libraries

Should the workshop materials for art and architecture students stay in the studio? Or should we make space in the library for collaborative and multidisciplinary creative work? What do you think, arlisnappers?

Makerspaces are popping up in many public and school libraries, and are changing the way people see the library. Also known as fablabs, hackerspaces, and techshops, these creative community workshops offer tools, materials, and technology such as 3D printing, video editing software, bookbinding machines, and more. This trend to include the creative arts in libraries is supported by programs such as the Library as Incubator Project, who encourage collaborations between libraries and artists.

So, how does this concept fit in with art and design institutions? In academic libraries, a makerspace can encourage an increase in cross-faculty collaboration, as these work spaces attract students from many disciplines. For art, architecture and design students, spaces such as these could provide them with new creative outlets and expose them to the work of students from other faculties. Technology such as 3D printers and laser cutters that may only be available in certain faculties could become useful resources for these students.

Though academic libraries have been slower to embrace makerspaces, this is starting to change. Campuswide 3D printing has often been the first step in this evolution. The first academic library in the US to offer 3D printing to all students was the DeLaMare Science and Engineering Library at the University of Nevada, which was installed in July of 2012(1). After finding that most library patrons accessed journal articles online, while print copies were taking up valuable space, it was decided that low-use items would be stored in a warehouse to make room for this creative space(2). With whiteboard-painted walls, the space attracts a larger crowd than it previously did: hourly head counts have gone from a maximum of 24 pre-renovations, to now averaging more than 200(2).

The 3D Printer at the DeLaMare Science and Technology Library, University of Nevada, Reno.

The 3D Printer at the DeLaMare Science and Technology Library, University of Nevada, Reno.
Creative Commons licensed image via DSTL UNR.

The University of Michigan’s 3D Lab is another prime example. Located in their Digital Media Commons, the 3D printers and scanners attract students from a range of disciplines. Some examples of its use by design students include making prototypes for shoe designs and iPhone cases with retractable headphones. John Marshall, an assistant professor at the School of Art & Design, regularly uses this technology to create parts for his art, such as THR_33 (Tea House for Robots).

Clearly, there is a great potential for innovation with this concept. My question for you is, how do you think areas such as makerspaces would be best implemented in relation to academic art and design libraries? Would you like to see a similar space in an art library, and which tools would you include? Or do you think makerspaces would be best located outside the library?

We would love to hear your experience with creative spaces in academic libraries. Share your story in the comments below, or on our facebook post.

Interested in learning more about makerspaces? Check out these links:

Libraries & Maker Culture: A Resource Guide: http://library-maker-culture.weebly.com/index.html

Listing of Maker Community Groups: http://archive.makezine.com/groups/

7 Things You Should Know About Makerspaces: http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ELI7095.pdf

Cited Sources:

(1) Wolterbeek, M. “DeLaMare Science and Engineering Library first in nation to offer 3D printing campuswide.” Nevada Today. http://www.unr.edu/nevada-today/news/2012/3d-copier

(2) Good, Travis. (2013). Three Makerspace Models That Work. American Libraries Magazine, January/February. Retrieved from http://www.americanlibrariesmagazine.org/article/manufacturing-makerspaces


Job Posting: ARTstor Library Relations Associate

ARTstor
Library Relations Associate
New York City

ARTstor is a not-for-profit organization that assembles and makes available a Digital Library of images and associated data for noncommercial educational and scholarly uses, and an image management platform called Shared Shelf.  The Digital Library and Shared Shelf are made available online through site licenses with educational and other not-for-profit institutions. ARTstor is headquartered in New York, NY.

The Library Relations Associate will share responsibility for expanding the ARTstor Digital Library and Shared Shelf participation within the educational community.  Additional duties will involve billing, invoicing, and other special projects. The ARTstor community of potential participants consists of not-for-profit institutions in the United States and other countries. This position will require some travel (approx. 25%), and will demand a self-motivated, flexible, organized team player who thrives in an environment of constant change.

The LR Associate will report directly to the Associate Director for Library Relations.

Duties and Responsibilities

1.       Working to meet and exceed participation and revenue goals on an annual basis;

2.       Communicating ARTstor’s mission, messages, and participation fee rationale to potential participants;

3.       Identifying and managing new participation opportunities in the academic community;

4.       Facilitating participation in ARTstor Digital Library at the institutional level by demonstrating ARTstor, its services and tools, and providing librarians and faculty members with useful information and strategies for promoting ARTstor as a campus-wide resource and platform;

5.       Shepherding potential participants through the sales pipeline, including:

  • Responding, via email and telephone, to participation inquiries via the ARTstor website
  • Tracking contact information and “pipeline” status in our customer relationship management software
  • Negotiating basic terms of License Agreements
  • Working with other units to establish institutional access to the ARTstor Digital Library
  • Giving remote demonstrations of ARTstor via GoToMeeting or other live conference software
  • Setting up trial access for interested institutions

6.       Representing ARTstor at conferences and other events deemed appropriate for this community;

7.       Working closely with the Associate Director and other Library Relations team members on research projects, including market research;

8.       Assisting with updating and maintaining the Talisma customer relationship management tool;

9.       Contributing to internal reports;

10.   Participating in all Library Relations and ARTstor staff meetings;

11.   Keeping up-to-date on various ARTstor initiatives and developments and being able to communicate these initiatives to potential participants;

12.   Additional special projects as assigned by the Associate Director and other senior staff members.

Requirements

  • Excellent communication skills in a variety of settings;
  • Attention to detail and accuracy;
  • Ability to work well as a team member;
  • Strong technology skills, including familiarity with metadata structures, trends and web development as well as project management experience;
  • Exceptional organizational skills;
  • Ability to perform independently, be self-motivated, adapt to constant change and able to juggle multiple tasks with a positive attitude;
  • Strong commitment and interest in the use of images in an educational setting;
  • Bachelor’s Degree;
  • 3-4 years of experience in academic library or web/software development fields.

Desirable

  • Familiarity with the ARTstor Digital Library;
  • Art, art history, or architectural background;
  • Business development, marketing, and/or academic library experience;
  • Working knowledge of image management software and database technology;
  • Experience with customer relationship management software (Talisma, Sales Force or other);
  • Master’s Degree.

ARTstor is an equal opportunity employer. ARTstor offers a competitive salary and excellent benefits. Applications for the position should be submitted to: careers@artstor.org

Applicants must submit a cover letter with salary requirements along with their resume.  No phone calls please.


Job Posting: Curator in the Office of Art Properties, Avery @ Columbia

The Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library seeks a knowledgeable, experienced, and collaborative individual for the position of Curator in the Office of Art Properties. Reporting to the Director, the Curator is responsible for the management, use, preservation, and development of Columbia University’s art holdings: paintings, sculpture, drawings, prints, photographs, decorative arts, and other objects. Specific duties:

  • plans and establishes policies, working in collaboration with the  Director and the Committee on Art Properties
  • oversees the operation of the unit; hiring and supervision of staff, ensuring sound fiscal management and budgetary compliance
  • serves as spokesperson for the unit in relations with university departments, and with the public
  • assesses works of art for possible acquisitions, ensures safe handling and storage, and coordinates conservation
  • oversees the management of collections, evaluating the proper uses of works of art, making decisions about lending art objects and responding to requests for reproducing art objects
  • works to achieve maximum awareness and accessibility of the collection for research,  teaching, and exhibition; will develop and manage a digitization plan for documenting art works and for making them accessible via web-based access and exhibition portals
  • cultivates relations with donors, alumni, arts colleagues at other institutions, and community representatives

Required:

  • M.A. (Ph.D. preferred) in art history; MLS or graduate-level degree or certification in cultural object-oriented collections management or equivalent experience.
  • Experience in a leadership position managing an art collection;
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills, strong organizational and problem-solving capabilities;
  • Demonstrated project management experience;
  • Experience in fund-raising, grant preparation, and donor cultivation.
  • Ability to work as part of a staff team, with a broad range of university colleagues, with students and with donors.
  • Should have knowledge of collection management and museum practices;
  • Interest in fostering fresh and interdisciplinary approaches to presenting and interpreting art and making the collection accessible for study and research.

Preferred:

  • Experience in records and collection management, instructional uses of cultural objects, and exhibit and digital project development.

For immediate consideration, please apply online at: https://academicjobs.columbia.edu/applicants/Central?quickFind=54991

Columbia University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer


ARLIS/NA Lunchtime Chat on VRCs and Academic Libraries: Friday, April 16

ARLIS/NA Lunchtime chat: “Visual Resource Centers and Academic Libraries: Shall the twain meet?”

April 16, 2010, 11am Pacific – 12pm Mountain – 1pm Central – 2pm Eastern
Moderators: Deborah Ultan Boudewyns and Greta Bahnemann, University of Minnesota

This chat is a lead-up to an in-person discussion at the ARLIS/NA conference in Boston on Sunday at 4pm as part of the Visual Resources Division Meeting.

* Are you interested in discussing the relationship between libraries and visual resource centers in the academic environment?
* Have you participated in a new conceptualizing of your visual resources unit? Will you be doing so in the near future?
* Is your visual resources center part of the university library system? Or soon to be?

If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, please join us for a lunchtime chat to discuss opportunities for visual resource centers and libraries, and their potential partners on the college campus.

Discussion questions include:

1. What is the future of visual resources on the college campus – and the corresponding relationship of visual resource centers to libraries within the academic environment?
2. If you are currently facing the merger of your visual resources center into your library, what factors determined this merger? Who on campus lobbied for this or against the merger?
3. What are the advantages and disadvantages of being part of the library or of being a stand-alone unit? Some talking points may include: budget concerns; staffing; integrated library systems; changing image use on campus
4. What are some of the future trends concerning image use and how are these trends affecting visual resource centers and libraries?

Deborah Ultan Boudewyns, Arts, Architecture & Landscape Architecture Librarian, University of Minnesota, and Greta Bahnemann, Special Projects Assistant, University of Minnesota invite you to join them for a follow-up conversation at the ARLIS/NA conference in Boston on Sunday at 4 p.m. as part of the Visual Resources Division Meeting hosted by Nicole Finzer. Please bring your questions and comments as well as ideas and opinions as we explore this timely issue and look to the future.

Instructions on how to use Meebo chat software are included on the Chats page: http://www.arlisna.org/chats/
Transcripts of previous chats are also available on the Chats page.


“Newbie Dispatches”: podcasts via ACRL Residency Interest Group

The ACRL Residency Interest Group has launched a new podcast series called the “Newbie Dispatches.”  It is a set of ‘casts on a variety of topics of interest to current library school students, recent graduates, early career librarians, and former and current library residents.

The first podcast is on publishing a manuscript for the first time, writing a manuscript prospectus, and getting into the world of academic publishing. The URL for this podcast is: http://acrl.ala.org/residency/?p=995

Our next cast will be similar, but will be a two-part cast with Kaetrena Davis-Kendrick, reference librarian at the University of South Carolina-Aiken. Kaetrena will discuss her experience with journal submission and publication, and offer advice to newer librarians who are considering publishing for the first time.

All of the casts are free and accessible by the public: http://acrl.ala.org/residency/

The group is also taking suggestions for topics for future podcasts.  If you have something you’d like to learn more about or hear discussed, just use the web form and send us a quick email: http://acrl.ala.org/residency/?page_id=9 or find us on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/ACRL-Residency-Interest-Group/113621396297


Academic Library Interviews

From the inside out and the outside in: The academic library interview process in a tight economy
C&RL News, April 2009
Vol. 70, No. 4

by Karin Durán, Eric P. Garcia, and Mara L. Houdyshell

http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/publications/crlnews/2009/apr/insideout.cfm


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