Featured Posts
Check out the latest edition of the ArLiSNAP Newsletter A Success Story:
New Art Librarian Ashley Peterson
Join the community: Volunteer with ArLiSNAP!

Job Posting: Inventory Coordinator, Kentucky Historical Society, Frankfort, KY

http://jobs.aaslh.org/jobs/6599963/inventory-coordinator

KHS is currently undertaking a comprehensive inventory of the museum collection that contains an estimated 100,000-150,000 individual pieces. The project will entail inventorying, describing, and photographing items in the museum collection to help gain physical and intellectual control over the KHS collections. The project will culminate with every object in the KHS museum collections becoming accessible to researchers through the KHS Objects catalog (www.history.ky.gov/objects).

A successful candidate will have a Master’s degree in Museum Studies, Public History, History, Art History or a related field. Other minimum requirements include: 1-2 years of experience handling museum collections, cataloging collections, and working with volunteers. The candidate should have 1 year of experience with the operation and maintenance of collections management software programs, Past Perfect 5.0 is preferred. The project does include moving some heavy items so the successful candidate should be comfortable lifting items that may weigh 30-50 pounds. The candidate should also have familiarity with writing for social media platforms such as blogs and Facebook.


Job Posting: Cataloger of Music and Dance, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah

http://joblist.ala.org/modules/jobseeker/Cataloger-of-Music-and-Dance/27277.cfm

The mission of this position is to provide accurate and prompt bibliographic records in local and international cataloging databases for the Harold B. Lee Library General and Special Collections materials that relate to music and dance subject areas. This covers all formats including text, digital, audio-visual, and serial, with a growing emphasis on digital manifestations. The mission also includes participating in scholarship, creative works, and other professional development activities associated with faculty status.


SAA Annual Meeting Recap

This year I made my first trip to the Society of American Archivists annual meeting, which was held in Washington DC. It was my first time attending a large conference, so it was a lot to take in, but I think I made the most of my time there without getting too overwhelmed! It was a quick trip, I only was there for one-and-a-half days, so unfortunately I don’t have a comprehensive report to give, but below are some of my impressions and opinions on the happenings at the conference and my experience as a first-timer.

My main reason for attending the conference was to network and augment my job search. I met with someone to look over my resume and discuss strategies for applying, and she was very helpful in giving me suggestions of places to apply to and offering to pass my resume along to colleagues. Other offerings for attendees in the midst of applying to jobs were not as helpful, however. There was a job board with postings, most of which were already on SAA’s website, and a place to post your resume, but I didn’t get the sense that either area was attracting that much attention or that career and job search services were a strong point of the conference as a whole.

As for professional development, the session I found most interesting, beneficial and probably the most useful to ArLiSNAP members, was a roundtable on visual materials cataloguing and access. In it, a panel discussed the new Descriptive Cataloging of Rare Materials (Graphics) guidelines, how they differ from and and relate to existing guidelines and how they can be implemented using MARC (DCRM(G) can also be used in EAD as well). First a “live cataloguing demo” was presented and then we split up into smaller groups to try our hand at using the guidelines to catalogue a photo album. When we reconvened as a larger group, each one had thought of different ways of titling and describing the materials (and some heated arguments ensued). It was a good reminder that there can be multiple “right” ways to catalogue, and that cataloguing is an art with guidelines to follow, but no real hard fast rules. In a room full of seasoned cataloguers all using the same set of guidelines to describe the same materials, differences abounded. Knowing that veteran cataloguers faced some of the same cataloguing quandaries I have as a new professional was reassuring, if not a bit unbalancing as well. I also attended sessions on preventative conservation, deaccessioning and teaching with primary resources. If anyone is particularly interested in preventative conservation, I have a handout from the session listing some great resources for disaster planning and risk management which I would be happy to share.

I also attended the Museum Archives Section meeting. Primarily this was a business meeting for officers, but it was interesting to see which museums were represented and what issues were discussed. Funding and administrative support seemed to be the main hot-button issues, which is not surprising coming from the non-profit sector. For those of us working in museums and other non-profit arts institutions, funding issues and defending the importance of library and archives’ place in the arts are probably things we will all have to deal with at some point in our careers.

I went solo, which might seem scary to some, but between my jam-packed schedule and the general bustle of the conference it didn’t leave much time to be intimidated. Plus, it being a fairly small professional circle, it wasn’t hard to spot former classmates and colleagues. So, even though I went alone, for much of the time I was with people I knew or networking and making new acquaintances. The biggest hindrance to attending was the cost. Being a recent graduate, I got student pricing which helped out immensely, but still there was the cost of the plane ticket, hotel room, food and transportation. I would highly recommend that any current students thinking of attending next year try to involve themselves in some way, whether it be submitting a poster or serving as a member of their SAA student chapter, to get some financial help from their program to attend.

Overall, I felt it was a great experience. There was a lot to offer for those interested in art and visual materials, and good representation from museums and other arts and cultural institutions. My goal was to network and I definitely made some great, and I hope lasting, connections. Besides trying to get help with funding, my biggest piece of advice would be to go in with a specific goal. Having networking and job hunting in my mind helped to keep me focused and not feel like I had to do everything.

Did anyone else go this year? What did you think? If anyone has specific questions about the conference itself, the sessions I attended or attending in general, feel free to email me!


Job Posting: Descriptive Cataloger for Special Project, Fieldstead and Company

Descriptive Cataloger for Special Project, Fieldstead and Company, Irvine, CA

Full-time descriptive cataloger to organize an extensive art print post card collection for a special library in Irvine, CA.  40 hours per week, temp to hire structure.

A masters in Library Science is required.  An undergraduate degree in art history is highly desirable.  Must have completed a graduate library science course in descriptive cataloging, including RDA, and have experience using OCLC, Classification Web and Cataloger’s Desktop.  Basic computer-assisted translating of European languages, including Russian, is occasionally required.

Starting salary dependent on qualifications.


Fall 2014 Cataloging Internship– Institute of Classical Architecture & Art, New York, NY

The Institute of Classical Architecture & Art (ICAA) seeks an intern to assist in the cataloging and maintenance of the ICAA’s collection of art and architecture books and its historic plaster cast collection.

Thoughtfully compiled over the years from donations from members, instructors, and friends of the Institute, the ICAA’s collection of books, monographs, sketch books and serials focuses on the classical tradition in art and architecture and serves to support the curriculum and mission of the ICAA.

The ICAA’s historic plaster cast collection is part of the seminal 19th century collection from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and serves as a vital and permanent resource of the Institute.  The approximately 100 casts are used as a tool of pedagogy and direct inspiration for students of architecture, cast drawing painting, sculpture, drawing and their allied building arts.

Internship description and duties

  • Works under the general direction of the Associate Director of Education & Special Collections (MLS)
  • Responsibilities include but are not limited to cataloging and processing books, data entry, general maintenance of the library and assisting to create metadata.
  • Intern must be able to commit to the position for the entire Fall semester or until the end of the 2014 calendar year.

Internship requirements

  • Intern is expected to work at least 8-10 hours per week.
  • Schedule is flexible during normal business hours.
  • Must be able to lift 35 lbs.
  • Strong research and writing skills.
  • Good interpersonal skills, responsible, reliable, and detail-oriented.
  • Ability to work independently.

This internship is unpaid but offers a food and travel stipend in the amount of $250 per month.

Individuals currently enrolled in undergraduate or graduate programs in the fields of archives & records management, library science, museum studies, or art history are encouraged to apply.

To apply:

Interested candidates should send their resume and a letter of interest indicating if formal internship for credit is sought, to Nora Reilly, MLS, Associate Director of Education & Special Collections, nreilly@classicist.org.


Visual Resources Intern– The Jewish Museum

POSITION SUMMARY:

The Jewish Museum’s Visual Resource Archive consists of photographic materials depicting permanent collections objects, past exhibition installations, and themes relating to Jewish history and culture.

Under the supervision of the Visual Resources Coordinator, the Visual Resources Intern will be responsible for researching and cataloging physical photographic collateral including glass plate negatives, 35 mm slides, and 4×5 transparencies. The successful candidate will have film handling experience and will be familiar with collections databases. This is an excellent opportunity for someone looking to pursue a career in the visual resources fields and to observe the inner workings of a museum visual resources collection. The internship will also provide experience and hands-on training working with the most commonly used museum collections software, The Museum System (TMS).

The intern will receive a museum identification card that allows for free admission to other museums and various discounts.

RESPONSIBILITIES:

 Identify, research, and store photographic materials in the Visual Resources Archive
 Transcribe information associated with the images
 Label archival envelopes for the permanent storage of analog photographic materials
 Use TMS to find information about artwork depicted in images
 Entering data and attaching images to records in TMS may be required

REQUIREMENTS:

 At least 3 years coursework toward Bachelor’s Degree in Art History or Photography
 Experience handling delicate materials such as negative and transparencies
 Experience working with analog photographic materials and scanners
 Strong attention to detail
 Applicants with coursework toward advanced degree in Art History. Photography, Archives and/or
Library Science preferred

Full posting here.


Visual Resources Curator– Lamar Dodd School of Art, University of Georgia

Athens, Georgia

The Lamar Dodd School of Art seeks a curator of visual resources who possesses a solid knowledge of technology and an acute interest in providing new proactive services and support to faculty and students. This position reports to the Director of the School of Art. The curator will be responsible for developing, managing, and delivering visual resources, and for managing and overseeing additional digital teaching materials. Essential functions of the Visual Resources Curator include administration of the collection and training student staff. The successful candidate will work within the Lamar Dodd School of Art with a community of over 900 undergraduate students in Studio, Art History, and Art Education, 100 art history undergraduate majors and minors, 100 graduate students, and more than 45 tenured faculty in these three disciplines.

It is anticipated that the future projects for this increasingly dynamic position will require multiple skills, including the ability to manage complex, multi-year projects, to work in close collaboration with the faculty, administration, and staff of the Lamar Dodd School of Art, and to build relationships with the UGA. Libraries and with faculty and students across campus who may be investigating the visual arts. Projects may include digitizing the Lamar Dodd School of Art’s significant historic art slide collections, and collaborating with the UGA Libraries to develop print and digital resources and services on site in the Lamar Dodd School of Art. This challenging and rewarding opportunity requires both creative flexibility and independent individual initiative.

Requirements:

M.A. or B.A. in art
 history, architecture, visual studies
 or a related field. Substantial experience working with visual resources collections with knowledge of the issues around the creation, maintenance, and access of a visual resources collection, including familiarity with standards for visual materials. Experience working with digital imaging technologies and library management. Reading knowledge of multiple languages, ideally including one Romance language and German. Excellent interpersonal and communication skills, and ability to work in a collaborative setting. Strong organizational and management skills, including the ability to initiate, track, and manage complex, multi-year projects successfully.

Desirable qualifications:

MLIS or course work leading to an MLIS degree. Experience
 with
 image collection
 management
 and presentation
 software. Knowledge of digital images best practices. Familiarity with Macintosh operating system and proficiency with PowerPoint, PhotoShop, and web content and learning management systems (eLC). Understanding of copyright issues related to image collection management. Previous supervisory experience or team leadership.

We will receive applications for this position through the University of Georgia employment website, under the position title “Program Coordinator II” (https://www.ugajobsearch.com ).

Review of applications will begin on May 19, and will continue until the position is filled.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 776 other followers